The best LED technical info exchange

Exclusive Interviews with LED Experts!

Leading into LEDs 2010, weconducted exclusive Q&A sessions with speakers, chairs and participants.

 Interview with Christian Jung, Quality Manager at Osram. Mr. Jung participated in our Design for Reliability: Working Together to Create Robust SSL Systems seminar. The seminar brought together - for the first time ever - representatives from Philips, Osram and Cree to discuss the issue of LED reliability.

IntertechPira: For your sector, which applications for LEDs are hot now?

Mr. Christian Jung, OSRAM: Automotive frontlighting (DRL), BLU, retrofit, streetlighting , and architectural lighting

Which applications will next make way for LEDs?


Mr. Jung: Automotive frontlighting (low beam, high beam), projection. Indoor illumination (SSL)

Are there any applications that could never be well-served by LEDs?


Mr. Jung: High end applications like cinema projection systems or stadium main lighting need specialization of LED development. All SSL applications can be served in the future. LEDs will devolop further and LEDs capture more and more new fields of applications, which were not imaginable 20 years ago. But not only the LED, the systems also have to develop further in order to adapt to the conditions of new LED generations, e.g. in the SSL area, where LED offers a much higher potential as only to be used in retrofits

LEDs are the subject of many governments' market interventions, including: research grants, bulk procurement programs, evaluation and labeling programs, and rebates to distributors and consumers. LED products may also benefit from federal and state minimum energy performance standards. What market interventions, if any, do you think are most effective? What types of interventions don't work well? Are there any interventions that are not being used today, but that might be successful if applied to LEDs?

Mr. Jung: Researcb programs help to further develop the LED technology and to move faster to higher efficiency of the LED itself and also of the complete LED application. For SSL both international labelling programs (like energy label, etc) and research programs will help to further develop LED technology.

With government initiatives, OSRAM supports and helps develop communication vehicles that enhance the understanding of LED technical attributes to enable education and the increased adoption of this excellent technology. International standardization is preferred over many different different national standards to ensure global consistencies and increased adoption of the technology.

What is the most amazing or meaningful experience you have had in your life, thanks to LEDs?


Mr. Jung: When starting with the blue LED (basis for white LEDs), we never expected, that they could become bright enough within the next years to be used in headlamps, high beam, SSL applications (e.g. street lighting), but new LED technologies (e.g. thin film technology) open the door for many interesting applications.

Learn more about the Design for Reliability: Working together to Create Robust SSL Systems


  
 Our next interview was with Mark McClear, Global Director, Application Engineering at Cree. Mr. McClear participated in our Strategy Session: Enabling the LED Lighting Revolution.

IntertechPira: You are speaking in a panel entitled 'enabling the revolution.' How will LEDs revolutionize our lives as consumers in the future?

Mark McClear, CREE: The more mundane side of the "revolution" will be that we will simply save energy, save money, and protect the environment by switching to LEDs. This stuff is not sexy and by itself probably does not constitute a revolution, but LEDs are already having an incredibly positive effect on all three of these. The "revolutionary" part of LEDs will come when both consumers and luminaire makers begin to dream a little bit and are no longer bound by the same old dull and arbitrary 2x4ft form factors or artificial constraints like "cold starting" and "restrike" issues that the old lighting technologies have constrained us wit in the past. LEDs can and will be incorporated into beautiful and revolutionary form factors that have not yet been imagined, and new control systems beyond simple dimming will make lighting effects possible that have not even yet been imagined...

LEDs continue to grow fast - what, in your opinion are the main drivers for this success?

Mr. McClear:
It's a party, and everyone is finally coming. The LED manufacturers were the first ones to show up, but even as fun as those guys are, it wasn't much of a party. The LED guys were taking straight shots of "brightness" and "efficacy", but it took some folks from the lighting design community to order some more sophisticated cocktails of "color" and "color consistency" to get the party started. The LED driver community is in the process of rolling out a barrel of new solutions like "dimming" and addressing concerns like "driver lifetime". Optical and thermal companies have added their distinctive brews to the mix, and the luminaire community are just about ready to start dancing on the tables... I'll have a "blue motorcycle" please...

You are joined on the panel by Osram and Philips - how can you all work together to enable the revolution?

Mr. McClear: The total bulb +fixture market is over $100B per year. LED is currently low single-digit percentage relative to this. This party is big enough for everyone to innovate, compete, and problem-solve. We continue to collaborate where it makes sense, cooperate where it makes sense, and also compete where it makes sense. The common enemy here is inefficient lighting, and we share a common vision to eliminate it.

What are the key technical challenges to enabling future growth for LEDs?

Mr. McClear:
A couple years ago we were completely focused on brightness and efficacy. Now we have surpassed all known incumbent sources on those metrics. We won't stop there because brightness and efficacy is the heart of the economic engine, but color consistency had to be addressed next. More work needs to be done on standardizing binning and making manufacturing easier within the standardized binning structures

What other economic and policy considerations are most important?

The leadership work that the US DOE has done and continues to do on efforts like CALiPER, Gateway, and the Manufacturing and R&D Roadmaps (and the attendant grants) is important, as is the standards efforts that have been sponsored by DOE. The US currently leads the world in SSL standards, and this would not have been possible without DOE leadership in this area. Bulb bans, rebate programs, and even Energy Star are nice additions, but not essential to the broad market acceptance of SSL. SSL has achieved lift-off and with continues DOE support we can push it into orbit...

Learn more about the Strategy Session: Enabling the Lighting Revolution


   



Dr. Huhn



T.P. Pearsall

 

Q & A with speakers Dr. Wolfgang Huhn of Audi and T.P. Pearsall of the European Photonics Industry Consortium (EPIC).

IntertechPira: For your sector, which applications for LEDs are hot now?

Dr. Wolfgang Huhn, AUDI: Full LED automotive headlamps are available from Audi and soon by Mercedes and BMW. All others will follow.

T.P. Pearsall, EPIC: Backlighting of LCD screens by LEDs is hot. This market will grow rapidly until 2013 and then saturate.

LEDs are the subject of many governments' market interventions, including: research grants, bulk procurement programs, evaluation and labeling programs, and rebates to distributors and consumers. LED products may also benefit from federal and state minimum energy performance standards. What market interventions, if any, do you think are most effective? What types of interventions don't work well? Are there any interventions that are not being used today, but that might be successful if applied to LEDs?

T.P. Pearsall, EPIC: Manufacturers Phillips, Osram and GE have succeeded in imposing a ban on the incandescent lightbulb. This makes CFL the new "cheap" choice, and this has really boosted the market for CFL. In a few years, they could do a similar maneuver and ban mercury, eliminating the CFL and making the LED the only available choice.

However, I think that the best intervention is the adoption of intelligent standards for new lighting technologies.